Weather

Another blast of cold is coming to Miami. Will the iguanas freeze again?

Elena Bello, vacationing from Spain, keeps warm next to a fire at the Starlite Cafe on South Beach as temperatures drop to the 40s thanks to an Arctic blast on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018.
Elena Bello, vacationing from Spain, keeps warm next to a fire at the Starlite Cafe on South Beach as temperatures drop to the 40s thanks to an Arctic blast on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. adiaz@miamiherald.com

Another round of cold weather is headed for Miami this week. But while you might need an extra layer on Wednesday night, it won’t be the iguana-freezing temperatures of earlier this month.

According to the National Weather Service, a cold front will blow through Miami-Dade late Wednesday, leading to lows in the upper-40s. The western suburbs will see the lowest temperatures, which could dip to the mid-40s on Thursday morning, said Chris Fisher of the National Weather Service in Miami.

Adding to the chill: winds between 15 and 20 mph, with gusts up to 30 mph.

As far as the iguanas, they likely won’t be stunned frozen by the cold this time around.

“We may still notice them slow down a little bit because when it gets chilly like that they do tend to conserve their energy,” Fisher said.

IMG_iguana_8_1_1LD3G1I5_L364971857
An iguana that froze lies near a pool after falling from a tree in Boca Raton on Jan. 4, 2018. Temperatures are expected to drop again on Wednesday night, Jan. 17, 2018, but don’t expect iguanas to freeze this time. Frank Cerabino Palm Beach Post

Crops in the region should also withstand the cold front, although Fisher advised bringing sensitive house plants inside.

But the colder than average temperatures of early January are not necessarily what Miamians should expect from the rest of the winter.

“Being that it is only mid-January, we will probably get a front through here or there but over all we are still looking for a warmer than normal winter because of la Niña,” Fisher said.

Daytime highs will remain in the low 70s through the weekend and could spike back into the 80s by the middle of next week.

In this January 7, 2010, video Sherry L. Schlueter, Executive Director of the Wildlife Care Center in Ft. Lauderdale, explains how to handle a frozen iguana. With temperatures dipping near freezing, these non-native reptiles can't handle the cold

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