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Halloween weather in Miami? More treat than trick, forecasters say

Halloween trick or treaters, like Daniel Hansen, 15, who was showing off his costume at a party at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando, should expect “perfect” weather for trick or treating in Miami-Dade and Broward, the National Weather Service predicts.
Halloween trick or treaters, like Daniel Hansen, 15, who was showing off his costume at a party at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando, should expect “perfect” weather for trick or treating in Miami-Dade and Broward, the National Weather Service predicts. AP/Orlando Sentinel

Mother Nature unleashed its scares over the weekend when an unexpected, if weak, tropical storm named Philippe passed through South Florida.

But for Halloween and trick or treating Tuesday night, the weather should be about as frightening as an old Nancy Drew novel. Call it a treat, National Weather Service meteorologist Andrew Hagen said. And get ready to fill your bags with candy with little to fear, except for maybe dodging some tree debris that remains in some neighborhoods from Hurricane Irma in early September.

“Should be a nice evening for trick or treating,” Hagen said. No, he corrects himself in a quick reversal: “Should be perfect.”

That’s because temperatures across Miami-Dade and Broward metro areas are to average in the low to mid 70s. “Definitely no rain,” the forecaster said. Winds about 10 mph. Temperatures may dip to about 69 west of the turnpike by 9 p.m.

And while anything below 70 degrees is considered a cold front for South Floridians, when you’re bundled in your ghost and goblins’ costumes it’s, well, perfect.

“It’s going to be nice and pleasant and still not humid out there,” Hagen said.

But it wouldn’t be Halloween without some trick or treat scare. This year, the warning centers on the consumption of black licorice. This week, the FDA warned trick or treaters to lay off the black licorice, especially if you’re 40 or older (and still trick or treating?). Seems that glycyrrhizin, the sweetening compound derived from licorice root, can cause potassium levels to decrease, which can result in abnormal heart rhythms, high blood pressure, edema, even congestive heart failure.

Hey, you need some kind of fright if the weather’s not going to cooperate and set a creepy mood.

Follow @HowardCohen on Twitter.

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