Weather

If you thought July felt like the hottest month ever, you’re right

Beachgoers played soccer in South Beach defying the National Weather Service's heat advisory for parts of Miami-Dade and inland Collier counties from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. According to the index, the weather should feel up to 10 degrees hotter than the mercury reading, from 105 to 110 degrees for cities including Miami, Kendall and Miami Beach on Wednesday July 26, 2017.
Beachgoers played soccer in South Beach defying the National Weather Service's heat advisory for parts of Miami-Dade and inland Collier counties from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. According to the index, the weather should feel up to 10 degrees hotter than the mercury reading, from 105 to 110 degrees for cities including Miami, Kendall and Miami Beach on Wednesday July 26, 2017. pportal@miamiherald.com

That time you whined about July in Miami being the “hottest ever?” Turns out, you were right.

July was Miami’s hottest month on average since the National Weather Service started tracking air temperatures in 1895.

The average temperature for most of the month was around 85.7 degrees, just under two degrees hotter than normal, the service reported. The average broke the previous record of 85.5 degrees in June 2010.

January through July of 2017 averaged 78.4 degrees, which is the hottest January through July period since the 78-degree record in 2015, the National Weather Service reported. The city’s had 24 days in 2017 with daily low temperatures warmer than 80 degrees, outpacing the previous record by 11 days. In 1998, Miami had 13 days with a daily low temperatures warmer than 80 degrees

The average highs for the month were about one degree hotter than normal and the average lows were just over two degrees hotter.

July’s high temperatures can be attributed to a consistent high pressure ridge over South Florida, National Weather Service meteorologist Ian Lee told the Herald last week.

“It’s allowed temperatures to not fall as much.”

  Comments