Weather

July about to go down as hottest month in Miami. Ever.

Beachgoers enjoyed the sunny and hot day in South Beach as the National Weather Service issued another heat advisory for parts of Miami-Dade and inland Collier counties earlier this week. Weather data suggests July is set to be Miami’s hottest recorded month on average.
Beachgoers enjoyed the sunny and hot day in South Beach as the National Weather Service issued another heat advisory for parts of Miami-Dade and inland Collier counties earlier this week. Weather data suggests July is set to be Miami’s hottest recorded month on average. pportal@miamiherald.com

If you thought July was especially hot for Miami, you’re right.

There are still a few days left to go until August, but Miami is set to have its warmest month on average since the National Weather Service began tracking the temperature in 1895.

The average temperature for most of July has already outpaced every other recorded month by a fraction of a degree as of Friday, with a recorded average of 85.9 degrees, said National Weather Service meteorologist Larry Kelly. The average highs for July have been about a degree hotter than the historical average, and the average lows have been about 2.5 degrees hotter, according to National Weather Service data.

It hasn’t just been hot, either — it’s been consistently hot. The weather agency issued two heat advisories earlier this week, and said Friday that the city was on its second longest streak of consecutive days with highs above 90 degrees, just 5 days shy of the 44-day streak set in July and August 2011.

The National Weather Service issued another heat advisory for parts of Miami-Dade and inland Collier counties from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, a day after the heat index estimated high temperatures up to 111 degrees in parts of South Florida. Sto

The reason for the particularly high temperatures, said National Weather Service meteorologist Ian Lee, has been a consistent high pressure ridge over South Florida. “We’ve had a lot of high pressure over the area and that’s helped keep a southeasterly wind” circling in warm air from the Atlantic, Lee said. “That’s allowed temperatures to not fall as much.”

Forecasters expect a wind shift in the next week that might lower the high temps to the low 90s, as well as increased chances of rain and clouds that could break Miami’s hot weather streak before it sets another record. But the latest three-month forecast does call for above-average temperatures for the rest of the summer, Lee said.

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