Florida

A gator wandering on the street head-butts a captor. Two cops got it from the other end.

When alligators fight back: This one attacks while being captured

An 8-foot alligator was found in the residential neighborhood of Hammocks in Ocoee, Florida, at the end of May. After being caught, the gator knocked the Florida Fish and Wildlife trapper out cold and then smacked two policemen in the face.
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An 8-foot alligator was found in the residential neighborhood of Hammocks in Ocoee, Florida, at the end of May. After being caught, the gator knocked the Florida Fish and Wildlife trapper out cold and then smacked two policemen in the face.

Florida, by now, is used to seeing alligators on the road. But this one had the fighting spirit.

An eight-foot gator wandering on a residential street did not go gently when wildlife officers tried to capture the reptile. Instead, the gator, likely looking for a mate, head-butted the trapper and lashed two cops with its tail.

The drama played out on a quiet street in the Central Florida town of Ocoee.

The contact knocked the trapper out cold, before the gator was eventually tied up and captured by state wildlife officers. A neighbor rushed to help the fallen trapper.

A neighbor posted a video to Instagram showing the captured animal being loaded into the back of a pickup truck.

"The gator flipped back and head-butted the guy," neighbor Walter Day told WKMG News 6. It "knocked him to the ground. At that point, it was [kind of] free and whacked police officers with its tail."

Before striking the man, the gator wandered around the neighborhood, people who live in the Hammocks subdivision told the station. Despite the fight it put up, the gator was caught and taken to a lake, according to the Instagram post.

Neighbors also said that dozens of people were outside watching and recording the alligator as it walked through their yards. One woman was about to open her door. If she had and walked out, she would have seen the alligator sitting on her doorstep.

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, alligators mate in May or June, and experts say that they leave the water when they are looking for a partner.

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