Politics

He’s Trump’s new communications director. But his past tweets show contrary views.

By Greg Hadley

ghadley@mcclatchy.com

Incoming White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, right, blowing a kiss after answering questions during the press briefing in the Brady Press Briefing room of the White House in Washington, Friday, July 21, 2017.
Incoming White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, right, blowing a kiss after answering questions during the press briefing in the Brady Press Briefing room of the White House in Washington, Friday, July 21, 2017. AP

“I like Hillary. ... I hope she runs, she is incredibly competent.”

Those words sound like something former President Barack Obama might have said, but they’re actually from Anthony Scaramucci, who was introduced to the public as the communications director for the Trump White House on Friday.

Within hours of the announcement of Scaramucci’s hiring, journalists and social media users had scrolled through his Twitter feed and uncovered a trove of posts that seemingly contradict things Trump has said on the campaign trail and in office.

Gizmodo dug up tweets from the 2016 campaign in which he expressed support for former candidate Jeb Bush, saying he “will make a great president.”

Trump made Bush one of his favorite targets on the campaign trail, criticizing him as “low-energy.”

Gizmodo also found a tweet from 2012 in which Scaramucci seemed to lament Trump endorsing then-candidate Newt Gingrich.

Another Twitter user found another tweet, since deleted, in which Scaramucci seemed to refer to Trump as an “odd guy.”

“So smart with no judgment,” Scaramucci continued.

Reporter Josh Billinson also found a tweet from 2011 in which Scaramucci praised Republican Mitt Romney for refusing to participate in a debate hosted by Trump, referrring to the event as the “Trump spectacle.” Scaramucci has since deleted the tweet.

On policy, Scaramucci has also previously expressed support for gun control in 2012, while Trump has told the National Rifle Association that “you have a true friend and champion in the White House.”

New York Magazine has recorded other instances where Scaramucci expressed views that contradict Trump’s. In 2012, he described himself as pro-gay marriage, pro-choice and against the death penalty.

Trump has expressed “my full support” for the March for Life, a protest against abortion rights, and called for the death penalty for any person who kills a police officer. His views on gay marriage are less clear, as he has said he is “fine” with the Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage, but critics say his policy actions have failed to protect the LGBT community.

In 2012, Scaramucci also said “all terror roads” lead to Moscow, accusing Russia of supporting terrorism and seemingly supporting Romney’s claim at the time that Russia is “without question our No. 1 geopolitical foe,” according to the Wall Street Journal. Trump’s notoriously close relationship with Russia has resulted in a special prosecutor investigating the country’s influence on the election.

Scaramucci has also expressed belief in the scientific consensus that climate change is real, while Trump has refused to say on the record whether he does or not.

Scaramucci has also said on Twitter that he believes that the “overwhelming majority” of Muslims “want to live in multiracial/ethnic/faith democracies,” while Trump’s comments on Islam have generated controversy.

In December 2015, Scaramucci tweeted a picture of a portion of the Berlin Wall with the caption: “Walls don’t work. Never have never will.” Six months later, Trump proposed building a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

In 2012, Scaramucci also expressed support for Hillary Clinton, who would go on to run against Trump in the 2016 campaign.

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