Joseph S. Gbembo at a cemetery for Ebola victims where his mother and three other relatives are buried, in Foya, Liberia, on Dec. 16, 2014. The Gbembos lost 17 family members to Ebola. For a fleeting moment last spring, the epidemic sweeping West Africa might have been stopped. But the opportunity to control the virus, which has now caused more than 7,800 deaths, was lost.
Joseph S. Gbembo at a cemetery for Ebola victims where his mother and three other relatives are buried, in Foya, Liberia, on Dec. 16, 2014. The Gbembos lost 17 family members to Ebola. For a fleeting moment last spring, the epidemic sweeping West Africa might have been stopped. But the opportunity to control the virus, which has now caused more than 7,800 deaths, was lost. DANIEL BEREHULAK NYT
Joseph S. Gbembo at a cemetery for Ebola victims where his mother and three other relatives are buried, in Foya, Liberia, on Dec. 16, 2014. The Gbembos lost 17 family members to Ebola. For a fleeting moment last spring, the epidemic sweeping West Africa might have been stopped. But the opportunity to control the virus, which has now caused more than 7,800 deaths, was lost. DANIEL BEREHULAK NYT