Guantánamo

Guantánamo notifying lawyers for prisoners on feeding tubes

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A closer look at the "enteral feeding" display for journalists on Thursday, March 21, 2013 meant to illustrate how Navy medical staff feed hunger-striking captives via a tube up their nose at the U.S. Navy run hospital at the prison camps at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This photo was approved for release by the U.S. military under terms of access to the prison that let a soldier review each and every image and delete those that show too much or certain details.
A closer look at the "enteral feeding" display for journalists on Thursday, March 21, 2013 meant to illustrate how Navy medical staff feed hunger-striking captives via a tube up their nose at the U.S. Navy run hospital at the prison camps at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This photo was approved for release by the U.S. military under terms of access to the prison that let a soldier review each and every image and delete those that show too much or certain details. THE MIAMI HERALD

Lawyers for prisoners held at Guantánamo say the U.S. government has begun notifying them if their clients are being force-fed during a hunger strike at the U.S. base in Cuba.

Lawyer Cori Crider said Monday she was among those to get the first-time notification. She was told Sami Mukbel of Yemen was being force-fed and was allowed to speak with him by phone Monday.

Crider says he has lost about 30 pounds since the strike began in February as a protest over indefinite confinement and what prisoners say are intrusive searches of their Qurans.

A military spokesman says the U.S. previously avoided discussing any prisoner by name. The military said that, as of Monday, there were 42 prisoners on hunger strike —11 being fed through tubes to prevent dangerous weight loss. Lawyers have argued for weeks that the hunger strike is far more widespread.

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