Cuba

The changing ways Cubans get their news

Iradia Casanueva sells copies of the Granma from a Vedado street corner. She wears a princess T-shirt emblazened with a Verizon Wireless logo, despite never having owned a cellphone.
Iradia Casanueva sells copies of the Granma from a Vedado street corner. She wears a princess T-shirt emblazened with a Verizon Wireless logo, despite never having owned a cellphone. Photo by Kevin Vestal

Iraida Casanueva perches by a street corner in a gap in the iron railing, her chamomile-colored hair sheltered beneath a tree from the summer sun. A stack on fresh newspapers sits in her lap for her to thumb through the headlines and comics when business is slow.

“¿Granma?” she squeaks at the strangers who pass her post, be they longtime locals of the Vedado neighborhood or wandering tourists looking for a bite to eat. They answer her with a small shrug or feigned ignorance. Pesos remain in pockets.

Her asking price is modest at two Cuban pesos, with a discount for her small band of regulars that roughly equals what she pays every morning to buy the Granma off the truck. A black duffle bag in the grass behind her holds most of Casanueva’s daily newspaper cache.

Two decades of this practice has helped her stay financially afloat, but now there’s a new media intermediate in town: the internet.

Read more at InCubaToday.

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