Colombia

More cancer treatment for Colombian President Santos, won’t affect daily duties

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday provided details about the evolution of his prostate cancer.
Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday provided details about the evolution of his prostate cancer. Colombian Presidency - SIG

President Juan Manuel Santos Monday said doctors in Colombia and the United States have determined that his prostate cancer, first diagnosed in 2012, had not metastasized or produced a “tumor” but would require additional treatment.

In a brief statement from the Santa Fe hospital in Bogotá, Santos said doctors had found “minimum” vestiges of his previous cancer and were recommending “medicine” and a single round of radiotherapy.

The treatment “in no way affects my daily personal or professional activity,” he said.

Santos, 65, traveled to Johns Hopkins Univerity’s cancer center in Baltimore last week for additional tests after doctors in Colombia found he had elevated levels of prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, a protein used to track prostate cancer.

Santos has been under routine medical surveillance since October of 2012, when he first announced he had prostate cancer and said he underwent surgery to remove a “small tumor.”

The health scare comes as Santos is trying to nail down a revised peace agreement with the country’s largest guerrilla group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

There are expectations that Santos and FARC Commander Timoleón “Timochenko” Jiménez will sign the new deal this week, although neither side is confirming the news.

Over the weekend, Santos said the accord will be presented to congress on Wednesday.

The initial peace agreement won international praise but was narrowly rejected by voters in an Oct. 2 plebiscite.

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