National

Young women in convertible toss small dog into traffic on LA’s 101 Freeway, SPCA says

A convertible that appeared to have four women inside threw a small dog into traffic on the 101 freeway in Los Angeles, California, according to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
A convertible that appeared to have four women inside threw a small dog into traffic on the 101 freeway in Los Angeles, California, according to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. SPCALA

There appeared to be four young women in the convertible traveling on the traffic-choked 101 Freeway in Los Angeles last week.

A dog was with them, too — until the young women tossed the animal onto the highway around 2:35 p.m. on Aug. 3, according a news release from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles.

A witness said the two-door white Sebring convertible nearly stopped entirely amid the gridlock that afternoon, and then the passenger door swung open so the animal was thrown onto the roadway. The small white and brown dog (“possibly a Terrier mix”) began running through traffic, according to the SPCA.

“They immediately shut the door,” said SPCA Captain Cesear Perera, according to audio posted by KNX.

Highway Patrol and the local SPCA responded after the incident, but no one could find the dog, the SPCA said. It was last spotted weaving among vehicles, headed south on the highway.

Read Next

“I hope he made it out,” Ana Bustilloz of the SPCA said, according to Patch. “Luckily the traffic was very congested so hopefully he was able to get out.”

Bustilloz said every once in a while an unwanted animal gets left along a roadway — but she said leaving a pet on the busy 101 is “super egregious,” Patch reports.

Witnessing animal abuse can be difficult, but according to the Humane Society of the Unites States, it is important not to turn away from animal cruelty. Here are tips to help stop animal abuse.

The convertible was headed north between Melrose Avenue and Santa Monica Boulevard when the dog was released, according to the SPCA. And while a license plate number was visible in a witness’s photo and is being used to track the vehicle’s owner, the animal welfare group said it’s still looking for tips from the public on the dog’s whereabouts and additional details on the car.

The SPCA Los Angeles chapter’s tipline is (800) 540-SPCA (7722). Information can also be shared online at www.spcaLA.com.

The SPCA said those involved possibly face felony animal cruelty charges, as well as a potential $20,000 fine.

Mercy For Animals captured video at a Franklin farm that's a Tosh Farms facility. The abuse in the video prompted JBS USA to temporarily stop accepting shipments from the farm while it investigates. Tosh said farm staff are being retrained.

Related stories from Miami Herald

  Comments