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First-graders bullied his son. He threatened to send a man with an AR-15 to school, Illinois prosecutors say

A Lyons, Illinois, man has been charged with disorderly conduct after police say he threatened to send a man armed with an AR-15 to the elementary school where his first-grade son was bullied.
A Lyons, Illinois, man has been charged with disorderly conduct after police say he threatened to send a man armed with an AR-15 to the elementary school where his first-grade son was bullied. Cook County Jail

A Chicago area man said he wanted to show first-grade bullies at his son’s elementary school that his child was “off limits,” according to prosecutors.

But his threat to scare the young bullies got Paul Chapman, 43, arrested on Friday, the Chicago Sun-Times reports. It also sent his son’s school, Robinson Elementary, and five other Lyons, Ill., area schools into “soft lockdown.”

Chapman had posted on Facebook that he was going to send his brother, armed with an AR-15 and in “full uniform,” to his son’s elementary school to “make an impression,” prosecutors said. That’s the same style of weapon that was used last month in a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., leaving 17 students and staff dead — and sparking calls for stricter gun safety measures in the U.S.

Accompanying Chapman’s Facebook threat was a photo of his brother in a military uniform, the newspaper reports.

Chapman was charged with disorderly conduct and turned himself in to authorities on Friday, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The threat came after Chapman’s son was pushed into a bookcase at school, causing minor head injuries that had to be treated at a local hospital, the Tribune reports. The day after the incident, Chapman called his son in sick, Fox 32 reports.

Chapman’s bail was set at $10,000 during a court hearing over the weekend, according to Cook County Jail records. Chapman is scheduled to appear in court again on Tuesday.

A judge also ordered Chapman not to use social media or have contact with his child’s school, according to the Tribune.

Chapman’s lawyer, Andrew Gable, said in court that Chapman didn’t threaten any particular person or institution, the Tribune reports. But Gable didn’t dispute that the perceived threat had been posted by Chapman.

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