Deadline Miami

South Beach streets dry despite king tide

Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine speaks while standing next to a storm-water pump being installed in Miami Beach, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. While the city is installing the pumps to mitigate the effects of sea-level rise, the first pump stations are being built in the more flood-prone areas ahead of the annual king tide in October.
Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine speaks while standing next to a storm-water pump being installed in Miami Beach, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. While the city is installing the pumps to mitigate the effects of sea-level rise, the first pump stations are being built in the more flood-prone areas ahead of the annual king tide in October. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

The king tide did not dampen the streets in Miami Beach on Wednesday morning.

Rain combined with the tide to cause some flooding Tuesday, but under Wednesday’s sunny skies, water pooled in small puddles near some drains along Alton Road, West Avenue and in Sunset Harbor.

The high tide peaked around 9:45 a.m. at about 3.4 feet, according preliminary readings from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s station on Virginia Key.

The Beach normally starts to flood at around 3 feet. Newly-installed permanent pumps and some temporary pumps have been working to minimize flooding during this fall’s king tide.

The pumps are part of a five-year plan to safeguard the Beach from the effects of sea level rise. A study released Wednesday says that tidal flooding will worsen for Miami Beach and Key West during the next 15 years.

Follow @joeflech on Twitter.

Related stories from Miami Herald

  Comments