Miami Lakes

The call came in as a large snake. Video shows what firefighter encountered.

Red-tailed Boa Constrictor captured in Miami Lakes

Miami Dade Fire Department's Venom One Unit responded to a field in Miami Lakes Aug. 22, 2018 after a call came in reporting a large snake. Capt. Jeff Fobb bagged the feisty boa.
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Miami Dade Fire Department's Venom One Unit responded to a field in Miami Lakes Aug. 22, 2018 after a call came in reporting a large snake. Capt. Jeff Fobb bagged the feisty boa.

The 911 call came in as a “large snake in a field.”

Typically, that means Burmese python.

So when Capt. Jeff Fobb from Miami-Dade Fire Rescue’s Venom One Unit showed up to the field on the western edge of Miami Lakes, he was not expecting to find a more than 6-foot red-tailed boa constrictor.

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“It was not happy,” said Fobb, who was captured on cellphone video trying to wrangle the feisty snake. “It was striking, but it missed.”

The Venom One unit, which In 1998 became the first in the country to house a fire department-based antivenin bank that covers most of the world’s venomous snakes, is often called to get rid of unwanted creatures.

Fobb said most of their snake calls come from the coastal areas, near Biscayne National Park and in Homestead. Miami Lakes is not an area that often has large snakes, he said.

The video shows Fobb circling the snake, which clearly looked miffed. He finally grabbed it behind the neck and placed a bag over it to block its vision.

“Snakes often do things to discourage us from getting closer,” he said, adding the boa was “hefty.”

The snake, which is not native, was likely a pet that escaped, he said.

The Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission will now pick up the snake, which is still in the bag and safely placed inside a box.

Two Irula tribesman, from India, hunt pythons in the Everglades.

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