Miami Beach

Miami Beach traffic alert: Drainage work will detour drivers on Indian Creek Drive

Alejandro Herrera , a 7th grader at Nautilis, waits for the school bus in front of his condo on Indian Creek Drive during high tide on Miami Beach, Oct. 9, 2015.
Alejandro Herrera , a 7th grader at Nautilis, waits for the school bus in front of his condo on Indian Creek Drive during high tide on Miami Beach, Oct. 9, 2015.

Drivers who take one of the main streets in Miami Beach will notice a hiccup on their commute starting Monday.

Due to construction to improve stormwater drainage, drivers on southbound Indian Creek Drive will be detoured at 27th Street to Collins Avenue, where two-way traffic will be extended north.

Crews will be installing new underground infrastructure where Indian Creek bends toward Collins at 26th Street. North of 27th Street, Collins will remain one-way northbound.

The new traffic flow will be in place for about a month. Flaggers and off-duty police officers will be in place to help manage the new traffic arrangement.

$25 million cost of drainage improvements to Indian Creek Drive

Local access to buildings between 26th and 27th streets will be maintained. Along 27th Street, on-street parking will be eliminated, but the adjacent surface lot with public parking will stay open.

County buses will continue to run during construction.

The cost of the $25 million project is being split between the state and the city. Since Indian Creek Drive is a state-owned road, $19.5 million is coming from the Florida Department of Transportation.

Work began south of 26th Street in the fall when contractors began building a sea wall along Collins Avenue.

The work has been accelerated because Indian Creek Drive is one of the lowest-lying streets in the Beach. In years past, it has flooded during seasonal high tides, causing concern amid bleak sea level rise projections.

In the fall of 2015, so much water bubbled up through the storm drains over inadequate sea walls during the king tides that the street was closed to traffic several times. In fall of 2016, the rising tides were held at bay by a temporary concrete wall placed along Indian Creek and temporary pumps placed at low-lying storm drains.

Joey Flechas: 305-376-3602, @joeflech

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