Miami-Dade County

Poop at Dog Beach means no swimming for humans

Meeka, a Boston Terrier, is curious during his first visit to Key Biscayne’s popular Dog Beach in 2011. On Thursday, May 5, 2016, the health department issued a “no swimming” after water samples showed high levels of enterococci, a fecal bacteria known to cause illness.
Meeka, a Boston Terrier, is curious during his first visit to Key Biscayne’s popular Dog Beach in 2011. On Thursday, May 5, 2016, the health department issued a “no swimming” after water samples showed high levels of enterococci, a fecal bacteria known to cause illness. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

State health officials issued a “no swimming” advisory on Thursday for the popular Dog Beach on Key Biscayne after two consecutive water samples collected there revealed high levels of enterococci, a fecal bacteria that may come from storm water runoff, wildlife, pets and human sewage.

The Miami-Dade office of the Florida Department of Health said water samples collected at the beach just off of the Rickenbacker Causeway exceeded federal and state standards for the bacteria, which may cause disease, infections, rashes or gastrointestinal illness if they are ingested while swimming or enter the skin through a cut or sore.

— DANIEL CHANG

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