Miami-Dade County

Heat wave! South Florida sizzles, breaks temperature records

Arianna Smith, 5, of Kendall enjoys a swing in the shade at Merrie Christmas Park in Coral Gables on Sunday, April 26, 2015. Sunday broke the record for the hottest day at 96 degrees.
Arianna Smith, 5, of Kendall enjoys a swing in the shade at Merrie Christmas Park in Coral Gables on Sunday, April 26, 2015. Sunday broke the record for the hottest day at 96 degrees. Miami Herald Staff

If you thought it was really hot out Sunday — you’re right.

The heat broke several records.

And while Monday’s high won’t be as high — around 90 — South Florida will still feel the heat.

Sunday’s temperature climbed to 96 degrees at Miami International Airport, breaking the daily record of 93 set in 1988 and tying the record for the entire month of April, which was logged in 1971.

“It is blazing hot out there,” said Dan Gregoria, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service.

Miami was not alone in breaking heat records.

The temperature at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport was 96 degrees Sunday afternoon, breaking the record of 94 set in 1988.

In Boca Raton and at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, the temperature hit 99 degrees.

The extreme heat — which feels even hotter because of the humidity — is rather unusual for April, Gregoria said. The average temperature is around 84 degrees.

“We are a good 10 degrees warmer than usual,” he said.

The heat wave, caused by a ridge of high pressure, will stick around for the next couple of days, but should gradually cool down by a few degrees by the early to mid-week when rain is expected, Gregoria said. By the end of the week temperatures should be back to the 80s.

In addition to the heat on Monday, the forecast calls for a 50 percent chance of thunderstorms.

Gregoria said staying inside as much as possible is the best option. And for those who want to enjoy the outdoors, Gregoria said stay hydrated and limit the time spent outdoors.

“I don’t think people always realize how hot it actually is,” he said.

Many South Floridians, however, spent Sunday at the beach, sport games, water parks or eating ice cream.

Saile Cruz, 45, went to McDonald Park water park in Hialeah with her daughter and daughter’s friend Sunday afternoon.

“It’s unbearable, but that’s nothing we aren’t used to,” said Cruz, who lives in Hialeah. “I’ll be under an umbrella enjoying the day.”

At Mark Light Field in Coral Gables, the thermometer peaked at 97.8 degrees just after 3 p.m., while the 13th-ranked Miami Hurricanes were in the midst of shutting out the No. 12 Florida State Seminoles, 12-0.

Regardless, 3,289 fans braved the heat to watch the series finale.

“It was painful to sit because the cement benches got unbearably hot,” said Ryan Salomon, 17, a sunburned Canes fan from St. Augustine. “We had to get up every two or three innings, but it was worth it. Good game.”

Meanwhile, those who attended the Miami Marlins game didn’t have to contend with the heat — the roof was closed.

And even though summer is still a couple months ways off, Gregoria said the early start does not necessarily mean South Florida is in for a scorching June, July and August.

“There is really no way to know whether we will be hotter than normal,” he said.

Miami Herald writers Susan Miller Degnan and Alexi Cardona contributed to this report.

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