Miami-Dade County

Why airplane parts from Miami to Syria just got a company in trouble

In this April 14, 2016 file photo, a Syrian man carries a carpet through a devastated part of the town of Palmyra as families load their belongings onto buses in the central Homs province in Syria. Syrian media says a pair of attacks on two security locations in the central Syrian city of Homs killed at least 30 people.
In this April 14, 2016 file photo, a Syrian man carries a carpet through a devastated part of the town of Palmyra as families load their belongings onto buses in the central Homs province in Syria. Syrian media says a pair of attacks on two security locations in the central Syrian city of Homs killed at least 30 people. AP File

An international electronics trading company with its U.S. office in downtown Miami sits at the center of a federal indictment alleging violations of the Syrian trade embargo by exporting airplane equipment with both a civilian and military use.

The indictment accuses 11 people, several of whom work for AW-Tronics, and Syrian Arab Airlines of the violations.

AW, managed in Miami by Arash Caby and in Bulgaria by Ali Caby, took care of the sales and delivery of airplane parts and equipment to Syrian Arab Airlines. Meanwhile, the indictment alleges, AW’s compliance officer, Marjan Caby, helped keep the deal wheels moving by falsifying government documents about the shipments to the airline.

The Department of Justice says the equipment has civilian and military uses and the airline has “assisted the Syrian government’s violent crackdown on its people.”

Along with the Cabys, Adib Zeno, Rizk Ali, Ammar Al Mounajed, Zhelyaz Andreev, Mihaela Nenova, Lyubka Hristova, Iskren Georgiev and Ivan Sergiev were indicted.

The exact charges are conspiracy to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and to defraud the U.S. Government; substantive violations of IEEPA and the Export Administration Regulations regarding the Syrian Embargo; smuggling goods from the U.S.; submitting false or misleading export information; conspiracy to commit money laundering; and false statements.

David J. Neal: 305-376-3559, @DavidJNeal

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