Community Conversations

How do high tides affect your day-to-day routine?

King tide effects at Alton Road and North Bay Road on Oct. 27. Locals reported flooding even away from the beach.
King tide effects at Alton Road and North Bay Road on Oct. 27. Locals reported flooding even away from the beach. wmichot@miamiherald.com

As part of Community Conversations, we asked the following question to readers on social media and the Public Insight Network recently: How do high tides affect your day-to-day routine? Thanks for all of your responses. Below is a sampling of your comments, some of which were edited for length and clarity. Learn more about the Public Insight Network and comment on previous discussions at MiamiHerald.com/community and select Community Conversations.

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I have lived in my home for 15 years and the king tides have grown considerably in that time. The street I live on, as well as my yard, were inundated by salt water. Beyond the inconvenience of changing walking and driving routes, my pets were marooned during the tides. Sea level rise will continue to exacerbate poor drainage and flood control in my area. Anyone who doubts climate change should witness the sea come through the storm drains — fish were swimming in the street. Thank goodness we did not have heavy rain during this last king tide.

Robin Rorapaugh, Hollywood

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I do take between three and four trips each week to assist my two aging aunts who live one block from the ocean, on Harding Avenue and 87th Street. So my predicament rests on traveling to visit them, and whether I would need to swim to their building. I have thrown away my shoes, after wading in the flood waters, as they were ruined. Any news about inclement weather will make me stay home. Let alone the huge traffic congestion spots, such as Abbott Avenue at 71st Street, is very stressful, even when sitting in a county bus. I avoid going anywhere in Miami Beach during reports of expected flood waters reaching far into the streets.

Michael Hidalgo, Kendall

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My family owns and operates The Palms Hotel & Spa on Collins Avenue. Drove myself through salt water and got feedback from our frustrated staff and valet parking attendants. The city could have done a better job preparing for traffic rerouting and coordinate with the paving project on Alton Road.

Nicola Meyer, Miami Beach

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When I was a kid (1954-55), we used to take our visiting friends to Miami Beach to show them the lights and such. And even back then, Alton Road was flooded by the higher-than-normal tides. Of course, I never knew what caused it, but I experienced driving through the flooded streets of Miami Beach, so I don’t understand why it’s such a big thing now. They should have done something about it back then, don’t you think?

Robert Reyes, Homestead

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The lower garage at the Key Biscayne condo floods up to 10 inches at high tide making it impossible to get to your car or bike for hours at a shot. You need to get the guy to come with the golf cart and carry you.

Charles Collins, Pinecrest

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During the king tides, A1A and the side streets south of Hollywood Boulevard are flooded. I was told that the rising tides tripped the circuits on the street lights. From approximately Sept. 8 to Oct. 20, the lights on the west side of A1A from Harrison Street to Crocus Drive were out. Toward the end of this period the Summit traffic light and the lights on the East were also out. So far during this episode of the king tide, the lights are working. I time my trips to coincide with the times when A1A is dry.

Theresa Lianzi, Hollywood Beach

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We have a weekend condo on Collins Avenue and 47th Street and our basement where we park is definitely a bit wetter. And of course Indian Creek Drive was closed during the high tiedes from 41st Street South, which caused major traffic jams for traffic going to the beach. Looks like we will need a lot more pumps.

Michael Troner, Miami

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Near our home in Sunset Harbour there was no flooding this year, while two years ago the roads were impassable. There was some flooding on 17th Street, and police were diverting traffic, and from 41st Street on Miami Beach. I took Chase to Alton Road southbound to avoid traffic and flooding at Indian Creek at 23rd Street. No big deal.

There has been no flooding where the city has increased street level by 2.5 feet, and no flooding where the sidewalks are below that level. On Bay Road, between Dade Boulevard and 18th Street, there is flooding where the street level project has not yet arrived.

Ted Weinreich, Miami Beach

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Our nonprofit, which is focused on cleaning up shorelines and waterways, has had to come out in high force to cleanup the amount of trash and litter floating in the canals, bay and shorelines. The waters coming over the sea walls caused the litter on the streets, sidewalks and shorelines to float away into the water. This is in addition to all the plastic and styrofoam trash already in the storm drains that was pushed out into the water.

David Doebler, Miami Beach

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Driving to Matheson Hammock, the parking lot is flooded, and there is a yield sign at the entrance. Of course we will yield to Mother Nature! There is no option but to notice that we must find ways to adapt to what is obvious and right in front of our noses. We can’t stick our heads in the sand because...well, it’s flooded.

Vicki Richards, South Miami

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