Community Conversations

Should Florida restart executions now that lethal injections are legal?

Most responders agreed that the death penalty should be restarted in Florida.
Most responders agreed that the death penalty should be restarted in Florida.

As part of Community Conversations, we’re sharing your answers to this question: Should Florida restart executions now that lethal injections are legal?

We asked the following question to readers on social media and the Public Insight Network recently: Should Florida restart executions now that lethal injections are legal? Thanks for all of your responses. Below is a sampling of your comments, some of which were edited for length and clarity. Learn more about the Public Insight Network and comment on previous discussions at MiamiHerald.com/community and select Community Conversations.

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“No, we should never allow this to happen in our state. Never. I don’t care how bad the crime is. People that kill someone else usually do it in a time of insanity, temporary or otherwise. We are in our right minds when making a decision about life and death for that person’s future and we should never choose to end someone’s life, doubling the wrong. I would feel the same even if this happened to someone in my family or close friend.”

Teresa Becerra, Coconut Grove

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“South Florida needs to stop playing God. No one is entitled to that privilege. I believe that there are other ways to punish criminals.”

Mariamee Rodriguez, Miami

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“It has long been proven the death penalty is not a deterrent to crime and, in fact, it seems to me that living in a maximum security prison is a far harsher sentence than the death penalty. The advantage of reinstating executions is society does not have to spend money keeping a convicted murderer alive. The disadvantage is that, with the advent of DNA, rarely a week goes by that a killer who had been on death row is found to be innocent.

Susan Sussman, Aventura

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“No, the death penalty should not be legal. Too many innocent people have been killed by State of Florida.”

Delawrence Blue, North Miami

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“The Supreme Court of Florida should ban executions in the U.S. Too many victims have been found posthumously to be not guilty. Some states will not even review corroborated evidence rather than admit that their courts rushed to judgment.”

Ted Weinreich, Miami Beach

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“The ‘Innocence Project’ has reversed a frightening number of death penalty convictions so one must assume that an equally frightening number of executions were unjust. If there has to be a death penalty then it must be reserved for heinous crimes with a conviction standard so high that it eliminates the possibility of false convictions. If the morality of taking a life unjustly is not enough, then consider the cost of a death penalty case over the cost of life in prison.”

William Masterson, Redlands

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“No, Florida should not restart executions. The death penalty is bad public policy. It is a great expense to the State even in comparison to life imprisonment. Experience shows that it cannot be applied equitably across all genders, races and classes. Persons have been condemned and later found to be innocent at an alarming rate.”

Daniel Thomas, Coral Gables

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“I found the decision by the Supreme Court to be incomprehensible. The chemicals used are improvised for this purpose and no licensed physician will get involved in this procedure for obvious reasons. I think this method of execution is no less reprehensible and perhaps even more excruciating to the subject than the old gas chamber was. Why not just administer cyanide and be done with it? Capital punishment is barbaric and unworthy of our country’s principles and certainly not a deterrent to crime as we see almost daily in the media.”

David Burkart, Miami

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“No, death penalty is more expensive to the state! Also there is a commandment that thou shalt not kill!”

Gordon Ettie, Miami

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