Broward County

Parkland documentary: Yes, they're school shooting survivors but they're also journalists

Parkland students produce documentary on how they are rebuilding their lives

Instead of talking pain and tragedy, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students share their story of hope and healing after the nation's deadliest school shooting.
Up Next
Instead of talking pain and tragedy, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students share their story of hope and healing after the nation's deadliest school shooting.

There's more to the Parkland school shooting survivors than blood and bullets — there's resilience, hope and healing.

That's the message students conveyed in a documentary produced by members of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School TV production team, about two months after the nation's deadliest school shooting.

The self-confessed gunman, Nikolas Cruz, a 19-year-old former student at the school, barged onto campus Feb. 14, riddling classrooms with gunfire from an assault-style weapon. He killed 14 students and three faculty members.

But that's not the focus of the 27-minute video, titled MSDStrong Documentary.

"The entire thing is a tragedy, but we didn’t want to start there. We wanted to say we’ve been through this and this is where we’re going," Eric Garner, the high school's broadcast teacher and executive producer of the film, told the Sun Sentinel. "That’s really what MSD Strong is. It’s how we’re rebuilding our lives across the board, for all of us.”

Garner said 50 of his students worked on producing the film.

“This brought a little piece of normalcy back to them,” Garner said.

The documentary features Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg and Cameron Kasky, three MSD student leaders who helped organize the March For Our Lives event last month in Washington and have advocated for more stringent gun-control measures after the shooting.

Students and teachers from across the country, as well as MSD alumni, also played a part in the film.

In a separate multimedia report, the Washington Post chronicled what it was like to birth the school's student newspaper, The Eagle Eye.

In the lengthy video, the Post shadowed reporters, photographers and videographers as they covered the tragedy they found themselves being a part of.

"We're students but we're also journalists," one student said.

The mini-documentary detailed instances before and after the tragedy, as well as what it took to publish the most important issue in their school newspaper's history.

  Comments