Diogo Magnani, a scientist with the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine, prepares cell cultures in a bio safety cabinet in this October 2017 photo. Magnani is the lead author of a study that identified a "cocktail" of antibodies that can prevent the spread of Zika in monkeys. This week, Magnani and his colleagues published an update to their study, finding that while the experimental therapy cleared Zika from the blood of pregnant monkeys, the antibodies could not erase the virus from the amniotic fluid, leaving the fetus at risk of infection and potential brain abnormalities.
Diogo Magnani, a scientist with the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine, prepares cell cultures in a bio safety cabinet in this October 2017 photo. Magnani is the lead author of a study that identified a "cocktail" of antibodies that can prevent the spread of Zika in monkeys. This week, Magnani and his colleagues published an update to their study, finding that while the experimental therapy cleared Zika from the blood of pregnant monkeys, the antibodies could not erase the virus from the amniotic fluid, leaving the fetus at risk of infection and potential brain abnormalities. Al Diaz Miami Herald
Diogo Magnani, a scientist with the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine, prepares cell cultures in a bio safety cabinet in this October 2017 photo. Magnani is the lead author of a study that identified a "cocktail" of antibodies that can prevent the spread of Zika in monkeys. This week, Magnani and his colleagues published an update to their study, finding that while the experimental therapy cleared Zika from the blood of pregnant monkeys, the antibodies could not erase the virus from the amniotic fluid, leaving the fetus at risk of infection and potential brain abnormalities. Al Diaz Miami Herald