Business

4 collectibles worth more than their weight in gold

By Roger Wohlner

GOBankingRates.com

In this Jan. 21, 2011 file photo, Peter Zavialoff of the The Wine House wine store in San Francisco, samples a glass of Chateau La Tour de By during the Union of Grand Crus 2008 vintage wine tasting in the Garden Court of the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. For cognoscenti, such lofty vintages can be a good investment
In this Jan. 21, 2011 file photo, Peter Zavialoff of the The Wine House wine store in San Francisco, samples a glass of Chateau La Tour de By during the Union of Grand Crus 2008 vintage wine tasting in the Garden Court of the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. For cognoscenti, such lofty vintages can be a good investment AP

So far, 2016 has been a challenging year for stock market investors. Often in this type of market, investors will gravitate to gold as a real asset and a store of value.

In August 2011, gold was about $1,905 per ounce. But by early March 2016, gold stood at about $1,265 per ounce. That’s a drop of 34 percent in a period of less than five years. That’s not much of an investment.

“Far from offering stability, gold is extremely volatile,” said retirement expert Walter Updegrave. “As measured by standard deviation, the iShares Gold Trust, an ETF that owns physical gold, has been more volatile than the Standard & Poor’s 500 index.”

However, collectibles can be a fun and lucrative hobby as well as an investment. For investors who are looking for non-traditional alternatives to the stock market, here are four collectible investments that have fared better than gold.

FINE WINE: “According to the Fine Wine 100 index, wines have far outpaced the price appreciation of the DJIA,” said financial advisor Kirk Chisholm. “Appreciating the value of wine is not only about money, but it is also about the personal enjoyment. Drinking your investment will not help it appreciate, but it is certainly a choice you could make.”

If you choose to invest in wine, expect to spend at least $8,000 to get going, and make sure you get adequate professional storage for your bottles, according to wine education site Winefolly.com. The site also said that wine is not a fast investment; prepare to wait six to 10 years before you sell.

COMIC BOOKS: Some comics books have had an serious return on investment. “Action Comics No. 1,” in which Superman makes his first appearance, is one of those comic books.

“(It’s) a true classic that, unlike most other comics, will retain its high value,” said Jeff Somogyi, marketing communications manager with DealNews. “In August 2014, one sold at auction for $3.2 million. Since comics are around 2 ounces, that’s about $1.6 million per ounce – way more than gold.”

It’s a good investment if you can afford it, said Somogyi. He added that the last “Action Comics No. 1” to go up for auction, which was Nicolas Cage’s copy that he reportedly had to sell due to financial difficulties, went for $2.16 million in 2011.

COLLECTIBLE COINS: “Coins are generally worth their weight in gold or silver,” and rareness can add extra value, said personal finance blogger Pauline Paquin. “A little quarter of an ounce gold coin can be worth $25,000. Prices have been going up over the past two years, in spite of gold dropping from $2,000 to $1,000 an ounce.”

For investors who are thinking about buying collectible coins, make sure you know what you’re buying. “Research, research, research,” advised the Federal Trade Commission. The agency also told would-be investors to plan to hold onto this investment for a minimum of 10 years before expecting a potential profit.

POLITICAL COLLECTIBLES: In a presidential election year, collectors might be watching out for political memorabilia that could be a good investment. Steve Ferber, of political memorabilia dealer Lori Ferber Collectibles, said that a copy of the Chicago Tribune from Nov. 3, 1948, is an example of a solid investment of this kind.

“This is the iconic newspaper error where the editors mistakenly declared that Thomas Dewey had defeated Harry Truman for the presidency,” he said. “In 1948, those newspapers cost 4 cents. Today, they sell in very good condition for between $2,000 to $3,000. Not a bad investment for 4 cents.”

However, Ferber said it’s important not to get too caught up in the frenzy. “For example, right after Barack Obama’s inauguration, people were buying and selling copies of The Washington Post and other daily newspapers around the country, from Inauguration Day, for hundreds of dollars – not bad for a $1 investment,” he said. “But just a couple of months later, they were worth $2, if you could even sell them. Rule of thumb: Items that were produced in the hundreds of thousands – or millions – rarely have great value.”

If you choose to invest in collectibles, it’s important to approach this strategy with caution, knowledge and common sense. Make sure you understand what you’re buying and its value before plunking down your hard-earned money.

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