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Florida homeowners are getting a break. One insurance company is cutting its rates.

MIAMI, FLORIDA - MAY 31: Michael Brennan, Chief Hurricane Specialist Unit, walks past the hurricane tracking map at the NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center as the media is given a tour before the start of the Atlantic hurricane season on May 31, 2019 in Miami, Florida. With the 2019 hurricane season beginning on June 1, 2019 and ending on November 30, 2019 officials are encouraging people to make sure they are prepared for the season with supplies and plans in place in case a storm hits their area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - MAY 31: Michael Brennan, Chief Hurricane Specialist Unit, walks past the hurricane tracking map at the NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center as the media is given a tour before the start of the Atlantic hurricane season on May 31, 2019 in Miami, Florida. With the 2019 hurricane season beginning on June 1, 2019 and ending on November 30, 2019 officials are encouraging people to make sure they are prepared for the season with supplies and plans in place in case a storm hits their area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Getty Images

Hurricanes gave South Florida a break last year, and State Farm Florida listened. The company is dropping rates for its 270,000 Florida customers by an average of 14.4 percent.

It’s a rare bit of good news for Florida, where hurricanes frequently bring higher home insurance rates. For any homeowner with a mortgage, storm insurance is required by lenders.

The reason for the rate drop: lower costs for State Farm. “We had few losses compared to previous years, so our savings will benefit our clients because we have additional funds,” said Jose Soto, a public relations official with State Farm Florida.

The rate decrease took effect May 15 for clients buying new policies; existing policy holders will see the decrease beginning July 1. Total savings to policy holders will be $95.9 million in premiums over 2018. Individual savings will be determined according to the details of each policy. Because of billing cycles, some policyholders will not see the savings until their escrows are settled at the end of the year.

For some customers, the savings will be significant. Maria Elena Cisneros, a Miami insurance agent with nearly 30 years of experience, said that one of her clients will save $400 per year.

Dan Krause, a senior vice president at State Farm, said the reduced costs were the result of “the stable tendency of non-catastrophic losses, improvements in costs and losses and the financial strength of State Farm.”

The rate decrease is possible even though 5,090 policyholders filed claims with State Farm for damage caused in the Florida Panhandle by Hurricane Michael, a Category 5 storm.

State Farm Florida was established after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 as a subsidiary of the national State Farm company. Because the Florida company is a mutual company owned by its insured clients, the decrease in losses is passed on to clients.

Although the company retained some of its old clients, it now only issues new policies for properties built under the state’s 1994 building code, which increased standards.

The company is sending letters to its clients announcing the rate cuts. It recommends that anyone with questions contact their insurance agents.

To date, no other Florida property insurance companies have decreased rates, according to the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation (www.floir.com). Homeowners can compare rates on the state website’s comparison tool.



HURRICANE SEASON TIPS

Hurricane season runs through Nov. 30. State Farm offers the following advise for preparing for storms:

Now

▪ Review your coverage to make sure it is sufficient. Renters should have policies that cover their personal belongings.

▪ Make an inventory of your property and its contents. Include photos and videos, and record the estimated values of your belongings.

▪ Shop in advance for whatever you need to protect your property, such a shutters, plywood for covering windows and doors, and fasteners.

▪ Before the season progresses, prune trees close to the house.

▪ Stock up on nonperishable food items and other supplies, including batteries

▪ Prepare an evacuation plan that includes pets.

When a storm is approaching

▪ Put away objects that can go flying and cause damage

▪ Tie up boats; put cars in garages

▪ Prep an emergency kit with bottled water, canned food, blankets and important documents; protect them by putting them in plastic bags or boxes