Business

Miami puts plan for strict short-term rental rules on hold — for now

Tomas Regalado, mayor of City of Miami, during a commission meeting on November 18, 2016. On March 9, the commission will consider a second proposal from Regalado that would partially ban short-term rentals in the city.
Tomas Regalado, mayor of City of Miami, during a commission meeting on November 18, 2016. On March 9, the commission will consider a second proposal from Regalado that would partially ban short-term rentals in the city. rkoltun@miamiherald.com

A proposed ordinance in the City of Miami that would partially ban short-term rentals and create a compliance system is being put on hold — for now.

The ordinance, proposed by Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado earlier this month, was set for the city’s planning and zoning board agenda Wednesday. The resolution proposes banning short-term rentals on platforms like Airbnb in suburban areas, which comprise almost the entire city, and creating a certificate of compliance, fines and a set of rules for homeowners in legal short-term rental areas.

But Regalado said Tuesday evening the proposal would be removed from the agenda, marking the second time the ordinance is scraped from city discussions.

Instead, a different resolution, also sponsored by Regalado, will go before city commissioners on March 9 reaffirming the city’s zoning rules, which already prohibit short-term rentals in suburban areas.

If this is approved, then we will want the regulations and the compliance and the fines.

Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado

At that meeting, commissioners will decide whether to just partially ban the rentals or also incorporate the compliance rules in Regalado’s original proposal, he said.

“The resolution I want to say is the first step,” Regalado said in an interview. “If this is approved, then we will want the regulations and the compliance and the fines.”

Over the weekend, Airbnb asked Miami users to send an email to Regalado and city commissioners showing their support for the platform, calling Regalado’s proposal “onerous” and “unnecessary.”

Regalado said he received about 60 to 70 standard emails, as well as others from supporters of his ordinance. Airbnb estimated the number of detractors to be higher.

“The many Miamians who responsibly share their homes once again have powerfully advocated for themselves, sending hundreds of calls and emails to the Mayor and city policymakers,” said Airbnb spokesman Benjamin Breit in a statement. “We hope the Mayor will allow them a seat at the table when he chooses to move forward with home sharing regulations.”

  Comments