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Want a piece of Miami Beach history? These lifeguard stands can be yours. For a price.

Life Guard Tower 113. Made of wood. Located at 13th Street; still in use. Will be relocated to 14th Street east of dune. Conditions: Cosmetically very good, structure good, unique. Miami Beach
Life Guard Tower 113. Made of wood. Located at 13th Street; still in use. Will be relocated to 14th Street east of dune. Conditions: Cosmetically very good, structure good, unique. Miami Beach

How would you like arguably the biggest dog house on the block — maybe in the whole country?

How about bragging rights to having a most original tree house, backyard tiki bar or a work of art to adorn your pool?

Cue a game show announcer’s voice as you read the following sentence: “These can be yours if the price is right!”

What “these” are are seven old Miami Beach lifeguard towers that have run the course of their useful life on the sands of South Beach and North Beach. They’ve already been replaced.

Beach stand roof ledge
Life Guard Tower 180. Made of wood. Located inside North Beach Oceanside Park (81st Street), west of the dune. Conditions: Cosmetically fair, structure fair, roof repairs 60% complete. Suffered roof damage during Hurricane Irma. Repairs are approximately 60% complete. Miami Beach

The towers date to the early 1980s, according to Melissa Berthier, the city’s public relations manager. They are on the auction block now at PublicSurplus.Com.

Opening bids as of Tuesday afternoon were running $100-$350 per tower — depending on the condition. The structures are marked as “good,” with one being listed as “fair.” Cosmetically, they run from “good” to “fair.”

The styles all differ, but the typical height for the lifeguard towers on auction is 16 feet. The base is roughly 12 feet wide, and the deck (where the hut is) is 14-15 feet wide, depending on the style, Berthier said.

You have the next two weeks, through Aug. 28, to bid on them.

“In the past, towers have sold for as little as $100 and as much as $3,050,” Berthier said.

Proceeds from the auction of these wooden lifeguard stands will go into Miami Beach’s general fund, she said.

If your bid is accepted, it’s up to you to transport your piece of Beach history to your property. You might want to check with your city’s zoning board, though, to make sure you can put one of these cool talk pieces in your yard.

Visit www.publicsurplus.com and search “City of Miami Beach” on the site to find them.

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