Home & Garden

Ask a plumber: The basics of water-saving faucets

You may be able to change out the faucet aerators at the end of the spout to high-efficiency aerators, or you can purchase new bathroom faucets with high-efficiency aerators already installed.
You may be able to change out the faucet aerators at the end of the spout to high-efficiency aerators, or you can purchase new bathroom faucets with high-efficiency aerators already installed. TNS

Q: I recently enjoyed your article on bathroom faucets. Your subject matter about different faucet types and styles was very helpful, but I’m interested in water-saving bathroom faucets. Can you please give us basics on water-saving bathroom faucets with helpful installation information?

Quinn, Tennessee

A: Basically, standard bathroom faucets are rated at 2.2 gallons per minute. The water flow of a typical water-saving bathroom faucet can be 1.5 GPM.

If you’re thinking about water-saving faucets, use a timer and a measuring cup to confirm the water flow of your present bathroom faucets.

If you find you have room to cut down on your water usage, you’ll have two choices to upgrade: First, you may be able to just change out the faucet aerators at the end of the spout to high-efficiency aerators. This choice can save a lot of time and material.

Second: You can purchase new bathroom faucets complete with high-efficiency aerators already installed.

Either way, you’ll now have a water-saving flow and be good to go.

Master contractor and plumber Ed Del Grande is the author of the book “Ed Del Grande’s House Call” and the host of TV and Internet shows. Visit eddelgrande.com or write eadelg@cs.com.

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