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Don’t beat yourself up if you occasionally splurge on a hot fudge sundae, food experts say

It’s better to allow yourself an occasional hot fudge sundae than fixate over what you are missing, food experts say
It’s better to allow yourself an occasional hot fudge sundae than fixate over what you are missing, food experts say

It was a love of food and a desire to help people that led me to become a registered dietitian.

A wonderful and unexpected consequence of this decision was meeting incredible dietitians from across the country. Whenever we get together, I record their words of wisdom to share with clients and readers.

Here are nuggets from a recent food-fueled getaway in Georgia:

Spread your food throughout the day to keep your body well fueled. Each time you eat, include protein and carbohydrate. Choosing a little bit of carbohydrate keeps you fueled and the protein keeps you full. This makes it easier to manage how much you are eating. Examples include peanut butter and whole grain crackers, yogurt and fruit or nuts and fruit.

Connie Diekman, former president Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Enjoy your food. Too many people are fearful because of what they read on the Internet. They are told if you cannot pronounce it do not eat it. As an example, ascorbic acid is added to food to prevent browning and it’s just vitamin C. And remember, each meal does not need to be Instagram worthy.

Chris Rosenbloom, author, “Food and Fitness After 50”

Be a B student. Nobody’s perfect — there is no such thing as a perfect diet. Better to allow yourself occasional food pleasures like that hot fudge sundae rather than fixate over what you are missing. What allows you to stick to a healthy eating lifestyle are the occasional indulgences. When a food becomes a never food, you obsess.

Kathleen Zelman, director of nutrition, WebMD

Three well-respected dietitians and not a word about deprivation, demonization or elimination.

We enjoy every aspect of food. We understand taste and enjoyment, as well as great nutrition, needs to be the foundation for recommendations. And it might not be apparent from some of our recommendations, but what we suggest is always grounded in science.

Sheah Rarback MS, RDN is voluntary faculty at The Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami.

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