Visual Arts

New outdoor art comes to Miami — and looking is free

‘Tower (Lodz)’ a 1993 sculpture by Sol LeWitt comprised of concrete blocks, is one of three sculptures to be displayed in public spaces via a collaboration between the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami and the Design District.
‘Tower (Lodz)’ a 1993 sculpture by Sol LeWitt comprised of concrete blocks, is one of three sculptures to be displayed in public spaces via a collaboration between the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami and the Design District.

In anticipation of the Dec. 1 opening of its new museum building, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (ICA) is launching a public sculpture program that will place significant works by leading artists around the art-centric Design District.

The annual rotation will launch in November with an installation of two monumental sculptures by conceptual artist Sol LeWitt: One at the Jungle Plaza, 3801 NE First Ave., and another at a newly renovated site in the Design District on U.S. 1.

A monumental Madonna-esque steel sculpture by German artist Thomas Bayrle, recently gifted to ICA, will be displayed long-term at the ICA Miami’s former space at the Moore Building, 4040 NE Second Ave.

“Engaging audiences with art beyond the walls of the museum and throughout our community is central to ICA Miami’s mission and should be an everyday occurrence,” ICA Miami director Ellen Salpeter said in a statement. “We are thrilled to collaborate with the Miami Design District on this long-term initiative that will activate public space through dynamic art installations, and to announce this tremendous addition to our collection by Thomas Bayrle in advance of our public reopening.”

“Creativity is essential to the spirit and dynamism of the Miami Design District, and public art plays a prominent role in engaging the community,” said Craig Robins, president and CEO of Dacra and founder of the Miami Design District. “Through ICA Miami’s exciting programming, we will be able to bring even more of the world’s leading artists to amplify the vibrant range of cultural experiences available throughout the neighborhood.”

The ICA sculptures join works from Robins’ personal collection already in the district, including a Buckminster Fuller dome and Konstantin Grcic swings.

ICA Miami’s new 37,500-square-foot building, 61 NE 41st St., will open to the public on Dec. 1, just in time for Art Basel. The location was donated by Robins and the Design District. Norman and Irma Braman paid for the design and developments costs of the new facility. ICA Miami, which launched in 2014, offers year-round free admission.

Rene Rodriguez: 305-376-3611, @ReneMiamiHerald

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