Jose Lambiet

New arrest warrant means deputies must arrest Livan Hernandez if they see him

Former Florida Marlins pitcher Livan Hernandez at the Alumni Home Run Derby Invitational atin the Miami Marlins FanFest in 2016.
Former Florida Marlins pitcher Livan Hernandez at the Alumni Home Run Derby Invitational atin the Miami Marlins FanFest in 2016. dsantiago@elnuevoherald.com

How does he love Miami now?

A civil arrest warrant has been issued for Livan “I love you, Miami!” Hernandez, the 1997 World Series-winning Marlins pitching prodigy.

The “writ of bodily attachment” was issued by a Miami-Dade Circuit Court judge after Hernandez failed to show up for the upteenth time at a court hearing in a lawsuit against him.

According to court records, sheriff’s deputies in Florida have been notified they must arrest Hernandez, 42, if they spot him.

The only way he’ll be allowed to leave jail is to pay $50,000 bond, according to Judge Eric Hendon’s order.

The order varies from a criminal warrant in that sheriff’s deputies will not actively look for Hernandez.

However, they’ll go get him if the lawyer of a man who won a $220,000-judgment against Hernandez finds out he is in the area.

“This is the type of order issued for cases where a person involved in a civil matter is ignoring rulings from a judge,” said Robert Frankel, the lawyer who won the judgement against Hernandez. “If we find out where Livan is, we’ll urge the sheriff to go pick him up. He’d then have to pay the bond before being dragged before the judge.”

Hernandez was in town in March to throw the season’s ceremonial first pitch at Marlins Park, but the order was only issued May 9.

The baseball retiree, who fled Cuba in 1995 and landed a $4.5 million-contract with the then-Florida Marlins before playing 17 seasons in MLB, has debts in this town.

Mostly to German Carreno Rodriguez, a local businessman who idolized Hernandez until the ball player borrowed $220,000 “for a short while.”

That was more than four years ago, and Hernandez hasn't paid back.

Hendon entered a judgment by default since Hernandez, who supposedly now lives in San Juan, failed to respond to the lawsuit. Hernandez was ordered to come before the judge May 9, but again failed to materialize.

Hernandez couldn’t be reached on most of the 19 phone numbers he’s had over the past few years.

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