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Salma Hayek: Donald Trump is ‘like a caricature’

Actress Salma Hayek is photographed inside Soho Beach House as she waits for media interviews while promoting her upcoming film “Beatriz at Dinner” on Monday, June 5, 2017.
Actress Salma Hayek is photographed inside Soho Beach House as she waits for media interviews while promoting her upcoming film “Beatriz at Dinner” on Monday, June 5, 2017. cjuste@miamiherald.com

We heart Salma Hayek.

The actress was in Miami Beach Monday to promote her latest movie, “Beatriz at Dinner,” and we were stunned to see that the “Dusk Til Dawn” star is 50.

The mother of one turns 51 in September (her husband is mega mogul François-Henri Pinault).

Hayek appeared on “Despierta America” with director Miguel Arteta (“The Good Girl”), to chat with press and later moved onto the Soho Beach House. The “Desperado” star wore a floral dress and high wedges, her hair flattened stick straight (despite the humidity).

When asked if she was bothered by Miami’s rainy weather, Hayek said, “No. Miami is always beautiful,” and was excited to discuss the film, out Friday.

In the indie/black comedy, Hayek, who plays a healer and massage therapist, is forced to attend a very uncomfortable dinner party thrown by her employer (Connie Britton).

After her car breaks down, Beatriz is invited to sit with the guests, many of whom are snooty social climbers. Beatriz butts heads with one man in particular, Doug Strutt (John Lithgow), a sexist, twice divorced Southern California-based zillionaire real estate mogul who has a reputation for ruthless business dealings in Mexico.

Hayek, who, like her character, is Mexican, is not afraid of him, though.

“She says what she thinks. She’s not a hypocrite,” she said simply.

We had to ask: Since the movie was filmed during the campaign, was Doug inspired by POTUS?

“Some of the things he said about Mexicans really enraged us,” said Arteta, who is from Puerto Rico. “This society has become so apathetic [that] we could get a man who is so incredibly rude and prejudiced — if this movie helps you think about how can we bridge that gap in communication, how we can care more about it, that would be great.”

Hayek, who has been outspoken about Donald Trump’s Mexican border wall proposition, thinks Doug is actually more reasonable than the president.

“The other side is treated with a lot of respect,” she says. “It’s not like a caricature. Like you know sometimes the president looks like and says things like a caricature? Our character was not trying to be the president. He actually says a lot of things that you understand the logic behind it. Why he thinks that way.”

So in this case, is truth stranger than fiction?

“If I put Donald Trump in a movie,” Arteta said. “I wouldn’t believe it.”

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