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Woman posed as cop to get cheap Chick-fil-A — and got felony charges instead, Georgia court records say

Tara Marie Solem, a Georgia woman who police say pretended to be an undercover federal agent to get a discount at a Marietta Chick-fil-A, faces two felony charges for impersonating an officer, court records said.
Tara Marie Solem, a Georgia woman who police say pretended to be an undercover federal agent to get a discount at a Marietta Chick-fil-A, faces two felony charges for impersonating an officer, court records said. AP

A woman who posed as a federal agent to get a discounted Chick-fil-A meal in Marietta, Ga., didn’t get the cheap lunch she was after — but she did get felony charges, according to court documents.

Tara Marie Solem was arrested the day after the July 2017 encounter and was released on bond, the Marietta Daily Journal reports. She was charged Feb. 15 with two counts of impersonating an officer for the incident.

Solem had told workers at the drive-thru around 1 p.m. on July 5 that she was a federal agent, police said. She tried explaining away her lack of a uniform by saying she was undercover, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

But the Chick-fil-A workers weren’t buying it, and so Solem headed into the eatery to argue with them more directly, court documents said. Once she got inside, Solem confronted two managers and swore in front of children eating at the Chick-fil-A, court records said. Eventually, Solem even whipped out her wallet to show off a silver badge, according to court records obtained by WXIA.

Still, managers wouldn’t relent, the Journal-Constitution reports, because Solem wasn’t in uniform. That’s when Solem accused the Chick-fil-A employees of risking her life by demanding she be in uniform to get the discount, court records said.

chic-fil-a
Tara Marie Solem Cobb County Sheriff’s Office

Solem said that “asking her to be in uniform would blow her cover,” which could possibly “get her killed,” according to a warrant obtained by the newspaper.

Later, though — when Solem got on the phone with the fast food chain’s corporate office to complain — her story changed, court documents said. Introducing herself as “Agent Solem,” she told Chick-fil-A that she worked not for a federal agency but for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Fox 5 reports.

But when police spoke to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, it turned out the state law enforcement agency had no record of any employee by that name, the TV station reported.

Police initially arrested Solem July 6 on suspicion of impersonating an officer and disorderly conduct, the Journal-Constitution reports.

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