A GOP ultimatum to Vlad

With the party united, the odds are now at least even that the GOP will not only hold the House but also capture the Senate in November.

College cost not big problem for poor students

To judge by this summer’s banner policy proposals, the most important question for higher-education reform right now is giving students easier access to loans. But evidence from Canada suggests those changes won’t address the greater need: Getting more kids from poor families into college, the key to moving up in an increasingly unequal society.

Torture is not a public relations problem

The CIA is on a “charm offensive.”

Preventing a massacre in N. Korea’s gulags

Since the U.N. Commission of Inquiry issued its report on North Korea in February, U.N. bodies, human-rights organizations, governments and think tanks have been working to respond to the crimes against humanity it documented, including the systematic abuse of prisoners and food policies that lead to starvation. But the report’s most chilling section rarely gets discussed: standing orders at North Korea’s political prison camps (the kwanliso) to kill all prisoners in the event of armed conflict or revolution.

We stand with the kidnapped girls of Nigeria

As president and founder of the South Florida Girl Up, a club of teenage activists in Florida for the Girl Up Campaign of the United Nations Foundation, I want to add my voice to that of other activists with whom I’ve collaborated to create and support the first clubs in Mexico, Ecuador, and Colombia.

Why the House should sue Obama

The Constitution states that it’s Congress’ job to make the laws and the president’s to faithfully execute them. It does not permit a president to suspend a law or grant special dispensations from its requirements. But President Obama has done just these things on numerous occasions, and only the federal courts can preserve the constitutionally mandated separation of powers by definitively rebuffing his illegal actions.

Sen. John Walsh plagiarized my work

On Wednesday afternoon, a flurry of phone calls and e-mails informed me that Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., had apparently included — verbatim and without attribution — several pages of a 1998 paper of mine in a work he submitted to the U.S. Army War College. Walsh’s paper, which also failed to properly reference the work of others, was one of the requirements for the master’s degree he received from the War College in 2007.

teachers-comment 07-25

Teachers unions’ destructive behavior

Left Coast Rising

The states, Justice Louis Brandeis famously pointed out, are the laboratories of democracy. And it’s still true. For example, one reason we knew or should have known that Obamacare was workable was the post-2006 success of Romneycare in Massachusetts. More recently, Kansas went all-in on supply-side economics, slashing taxes on the affluent in the belief that this would spark a huge boom; the boom didn’t happen, but the budget deficit exploded, offering an object lesson to those willing to learn from experience.

Undocumented children and the myths of illegal immigration

What if the Irish potato famine had happened today?

Obstructed by the Constitution

President Obama’s plan to transform the U.S. healthcare market is once again in trouble. This time, two Republican-appointed judges on a federal appeals court have invalidated a key portion of the program.

In Congress, a sudden push for felon voting rights

If advocates have their way, voting rights could be a new reality for the nation’s incarcerated.

Ignoring climate change could sink the US economy

Good economic decisions require good data. And to get good data, we must account for all relevant variables. But we’re not doing this when it comes to climate change — and that means we’re making decisions based on a flawed picture of future risks. While we can’t define future climate-change risks with precision, they should be included in economic policy, fiscal and business decisions because of their potential magnitude.

‘Poor doors’ inevitable in Manhattan real estate

Everybody’s mad about the “poor door.” This is the name critics have bestowed upon the separate entrance for the affordable-housing units at a planned new luxury building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Those who pay market rates would have access to extra amenities – gym, pool, Hudson River views – as well as their own doors and lobby.

3 ideas from Paul Ryan’s poverty plan that liberals can love

Liberals are used to hating Rep. Paul Ryan.

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