Jenny McCarthy, vaccine agitator, does a pivot

What do you call someone who sows misinformation, stokes fear, abets behavior that endangers people’s health, extracts enormous visibility from doing so and then says the equivalent of “Who? Me?”

It’s not Beijing’s hackers you should worry about, it’s Moscow’s

When U.S. officials warn of the threat foreign cyber spies pose to American companies and government agencies, they usually focus on China, which has long been home to the world’s most relentless and aggressive hackers. But new information shows that Russian and Eastern European hackers, who have historically focused their energies on crime and fraud, now account for a large and growing percentage of all cyber espionage, most of which is directed at the United States.

Gabriel Gárcia Márquez changed my life

Years before I met him, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez changed my life.

My fight with McDonald’s over happy meal toys

In the fall of 2008, when I was 11 years old, I wrote to the CEO of McDonald’s and asked him to change the way his stores sold Happy Meals. I expressed my frustration that McDonald’s always asked if my family preferred a “girl toy” or a “boy toy” when we ordered a Happy Meal at the drive-through. My letter asked if it would be legal for McDonald’s “to ask at a job interview whether someone wanted a man’s job or a woman’s job?”

Edward Snowden asked Vladimir Putin the wrong question

The question Edward Snowden should have asked Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday was: “Would you please describe how the three versions of SORM operate and what is done with the intercepted phone, email and other electronic media those systems collect?”

What Putin wants, and how he plans to get it

It was tempting to look at last week’s diplomatic agreement to pull Ukraine back from the brink of war and see the beginning of a grand compromise between Russia and the West.

What to expect when Chelsea’s expecting

The latest installment of a continuing series in which American events are described using the tropes and tone normally employed by the American media to describe events in other countries.

Attack on journalists in Afghanistan rekindles a daughter’s pain

When news broke this month that two Associated Press journalists were attacked in Afghanistan, a familiar feeling of loss and powerlessness immediately took hold of me. Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon were sitting in a car when an Afghan police officer fired on them. While I never had the fortune to know Anja, who was killed instantly, Kathy has filled an important role in my life for two decades, since my mother, a foreign correspondent with the AP, was killed when the helicopter she was riding in crashed into a mountainside in Afghanistan.

Vladimir Putin’s terrific, triumphant, all good, totally awesome year

Admit it. You wish you were Vladimir Putin right now. Enemies fear him. Allies are grateful to him. Women are drawn to him. Jimmy Fallon imitates him. Even Edward Snowden wants to be his video buddy. To paraphrase that great geopolitical analyst Alicia Keys, this guy is on fire.

Will Chelsea Clinton’s baby be president one day?

Last week Chelsea Clinton announced she was pregnant, and immediately political reporters began to complain about the “Clinton dynasty.” “Can you say dynasty?” wrote the staff of the Week magazine. Those words were echoed quickly by the Wire, which answered the question of when the gestating child would be eligible for the White House. (2053, if you’re wondering.)

Secession, a tournament for GOP

March’s NCAA playoffs are behind us but the madness continues.

Got Putin, yet?

The new “agreement” between Russia, the United States and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

Snowden humiliates himself

The Edward Snowden leaks were not wholly contemptible. Unlike — it’s now thoroughly clear — Edward Snowden himself.

Priest’s execution in Syria should be call to action

In the hierarchy of saints, martyrs are on the highest rung of the celestial ladder, at least for me.

Kansas, the KKK and hate without end

The news that a former grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan is suspected of shooting and killing three people near Jewish community centers in Kansas seems at first glance like a disparaged past flaring briefly into the present. Americans like to imagine that the KKK belongs to a long-gone South and anti-Semitism to a distant 20th century. Sadly, this better reflects a naive faith in the nation’s history of religious tolerance than the realities experienced by many religious minorities. Although the KKK has evolved and its membership has dwindled, it remains part of an American legacy of religious intolerance.

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