Jacksonville Times-Union reporter Tia Mitchell, left, Miami Herald reporter Mary Ellen Klas, center, and Associated Press reporter Gary Fineout, try to listen through the glass partition at the Florida Emergency Operations Center during a briefing of emergency managers the morning after Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida.
Jacksonville Times-Union reporter Tia Mitchell, left, Miami Herald reporter Mary Ellen Klas, center, and Associated Press reporter Gary Fineout, try to listen through the glass partition at the Florida Emergency Operations Center during a briefing of emergency managers the morning after Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida. Courtesy of Bill Cotterell Facebook
Jacksonville Times-Union reporter Tia Mitchell, left, Miami Herald reporter Mary Ellen Klas, center, and Associated Press reporter Gary Fineout, try to listen through the glass partition at the Florida Emergency Operations Center during a briefing of emergency managers the morning after Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida. Courtesy of Bill Cotterell Facebook

Florida lifts cone of silence at emergency operations briefings — media can listen in

October 06, 2017 01:51 PM

UPDATED October 06, 2017 03:08 PM

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