Hurricane Irma toppled a massive tree in the historic Ware’s Creek neighborhood, lifting an addition to a 120-year-old farmhouse several feet in the air when the roots tore from the ground.
Hurricane Irma toppled a massive tree in the historic Ware’s Creek neighborhood, lifting an addition to a 120-year-old farmhouse several feet in the air when the roots tore from the ground. MARK YOUNG myoung@bradenton.com
Hurricane Irma toppled a massive tree in the historic Ware’s Creek neighborhood, lifting an addition to a 120-year-old farmhouse several feet in the air when the roots tore from the ground. MARK YOUNG myoung@bradenton.com

This happened to a 120-year-old farmhouse when Irma hit. And the owner laughed.

September 24, 2017 8:17 AM

More Videos

In powerless Puerto Rico, washboards and hand-held fans are making a comeback 2:07

In powerless Puerto Rico, washboards and hand-held fans are making a comeback

Thousands line up for food aid outside of Tropical Park 1:19

Thousands line up for food aid outside of Tropical Park

Florida opens disaster food assistance program to provide Irma relief 1:22

Florida opens disaster food assistance program to provide Irma relief

House swallowed into the ground from Hurricane Irma captured by drone 2:01

House swallowed into the ground from Hurricane Irma captured by drone

Drone captures aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Manatee County 1:41

Drone captures aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Manatee County

Aerial view of the damage caused by Hurricane Irma 1:20

Aerial view of the damage caused by Hurricane Irma

3 steps for filing a flood insurance claim 1:42

3 steps for filing a flood insurance claim

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma 2:14

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma

Tempers boil over after residents denied entry back into the Florida Keys 1:30

Tempers boil over after residents denied entry back into the Florida Keys

How a restaurant owner fed hundreds of people breakfast hours after Irma 1:07

How a restaurant owner fed hundreds of people breakfast hours after Irma

  • In powerless Puerto Rico, washboards and hand-held fans are making a comeback

    Almost four weeks after Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, 85 percent of the population is still without electricity, forcing people to go old school, with washboards, candles and cash to manage life in the new dark ages. (In Spanish)