After Hurricane Irma hit Florida, the Internal Revenue Service moved a number of September and October filing deadlines to Jan. 31, 2018.
After Hurricane Irma hit Florida, the Internal Revenue Service moved a number of September and October filing deadlines to Jan. 31, 2018. Miami Herald File
After Hurricane Irma hit Florida, the Internal Revenue Service moved a number of September and October filing deadlines to Jan. 31, 2018. Miami Herald File

Irma might get you an IRS break even your accountant couldn’t

September 18, 2017 2:10 PM

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  • In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services.

    Workers from an organization called Mountain Point provide drug-users with packets of clean syringes, mounds of antibacterial wipes and rolls of gauze from a dwindling supply. Their goal in the wake of the storm is to keep opioid users in Puerto Rico free from deadly diseases they could get from injecting drugs.