Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Power, where are you? It’s back for most, but thousands are still in the heat

September 18, 2017 11:29 AM

UPDATED September 18, 2017 07:51 PM

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  • Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

    Model beach houses take a beating as scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science crank up a one-of-a-kind hurricane simulation tank at the school. Scientist Ben Kirtman, the Director of the Cooperative Institute of Marine & Atmospheric Studies explains how creating Cat 5 force winds and waves in the giant tank help with making predications and future forecasts that help save lives.