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  • DTE Energy of Michigan helps restore power to Coconut Grove

    The Michigan crew are part of a massive out-of-state relief effort recruited to turn the lights back on after Irma knocked out power for 6.7 million homes and businesses in Florida, a record. Power companies from 29 states — from Arkansas to California to Massachusetts — sent help. DTE sent 250 trucks to Florida. Among those crews, 120 linemen trecked more than 1,300 miles to Miami-Dade County to fix broken poles and downed wires, according to company spokesman David Lingholm

The Michigan crew are part of a massive out-of-state relief effort recruited to turn the lights back on after Irma knocked out power for 6.7 million homes and businesses in Florida, a record. Power companies from 29 states — from Arkansas to California to Massachusetts — sent help. DTE sent 250 trucks to Florida. Among those crews, 120 linemen trecked more than 1,300 miles to Miami-Dade County to fix broken poles and downed wires, according to company spokesman David Lingholm C.M. Guerrero The Miami Herald
The Michigan crew are part of a massive out-of-state relief effort recruited to turn the lights back on after Irma knocked out power for 6.7 million homes and businesses in Florida, a record. Power companies from 29 states — from Arkansas to California to Massachusetts — sent help. DTE sent 250 trucks to Florida. Among those crews, 120 linemen trecked more than 1,300 miles to Miami-Dade County to fix broken poles and downed wires, according to company spokesman David Lingholm C.M. Guerrero The Miami Herald

He missed his 23rd wedding anniversary in Detroit to turn Miami’s lights back on

September 15, 2017 07:15 PM

UPDATED September 21, 2017 07:51 AM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.