From left to right: Zak Chaouki, Lacrosse, Wis.; Christian Name, Los Angeles; Austin Thompson, Lacross Wis.
From left to right: Zak Chaouki, Lacrosse, Wis.; Christian Name, Los Angeles; Austin Thompson, Lacross Wis. Julie K. Brown Miami Herald staff
From left to right: Zak Chaouki, Lacrosse, Wis.; Christian Name, Los Angeles; Austin Thompson, Lacross Wis. Julie K. Brown Miami Herald staff

3 young men, 2 trucks and a cross-country odyssey to aid hurricane victims

September 13, 2017 10:56 PM

UPDATED September 13, 2017 11:11 PM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.