Gregory Lane Kniseley, a 65-year-old amputee who lives in a trailer in Marathon, is one of the Irma evacuees being sheltered at a parking garage on the main campus of Florida International University.
Gregory Lane Kniseley, a 65-year-old amputee who lives in a trailer in Marathon, is one of the Irma evacuees being sheltered at a parking garage on the main campus of Florida International University. Michelle Kaufman Miami Herald
Gregory Lane Kniseley, a 65-year-old amputee who lives in a trailer in Marathon, is one of the Irma evacuees being sheltered at a parking garage on the main campus of Florida International University. Michelle Kaufman Miami Herald

Irma evacuees from Keys with special needs find shelter at FIU parking garage

September 13, 2017 07:29 PM

UPDATED September 13, 2017 10:40 PM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.