St. Petersburg's North Shore Park was closed to swimmers in September 2016 after an estimated 70 million gallons of partially treated sewage had been dumped into the waters of Tampa Bay from Hurricane Hermine. It was just the start of a sewage crisis that would see the city spill up to 1 billion gallons of waste, 200 million of which ended up in the bay.
St. Petersburg's North Shore Park was closed to swimmers in September 2016 after an estimated 70 million gallons of partially treated sewage had been dumped into the waters of Tampa Bay from Hurricane Hermine. It was just the start of a sewage crisis that would see the city spill up to 1 billion gallons of waste, 200 million of which ended up in the bay. DIRK SHADD Tampa Bay Times
St. Petersburg's North Shore Park was closed to swimmers in September 2016 after an estimated 70 million gallons of partially treated sewage had been dumped into the waters of Tampa Bay from Hurricane Hermine. It was just the start of a sewage crisis that would see the city spill up to 1 billion gallons of waste, 200 million of which ended up in the bay. DIRK SHADD Tampa Bay Times

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March 18, 2018 09:59 AM