PLEAS, NO QUESTIONS: Democrat Hillary Clinton has largely closed herself off from media questions in the first month of her campaign. Her refusal to take questions stands in stark contrast to virtually all other candidates in both parties, who routinely wade into a pack of reporters after events, often fielding more questions in one event than Clinton has so far in her entire campaign.
PLEAS, NO QUESTIONS: Democrat Hillary Clinton has largely closed herself off from media questions in the first month of her campaign. Her refusal to take questions stands in stark contrast to virtually all other candidates in both parties, who routinely wade into a pack of reporters after events, often fielding more questions in one event than Clinton has so far in her entire campaign. Jacquelyn Martin AP
PLEAS, NO QUESTIONS: Democrat Hillary Clinton has largely closed herself off from media questions in the first month of her campaign. Her refusal to take questions stands in stark contrast to virtually all other candidates in both parties, who routinely wade into a pack of reporters after events, often fielding more questions in one event than Clinton has so far in her entire campaign. Jacquelyn Martin AP

Unlike presidential rivals, Hillary Clinton shunning questions from press

May 08, 2015 11:32 AM

UPDATED May 08, 2015 11:01 PM

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