In this Feb. 19, 2015 photo, the sun sets behind an oil well in a field near El Tigre, a town within Venezuela's Hugo Chavez oil belt, formally known as the Orinoco Belt. President Nicolas Maduro, whose approval rating has plunged to around 25 percent, has no choice but to lean on state-fun oil company PDVSA to help Venezuela back on its feet and has been quietly trying to lure back foreign drillers.
In this Feb. 19, 2015 photo, the sun sets behind an oil well in a field near El Tigre, a town within Venezuela's Hugo Chavez oil belt, formally known as the Orinoco Belt. President Nicolas Maduro, whose approval rating has plunged to around 25 percent, has no choice but to lean on state-fun oil company PDVSA to help Venezuela back on its feet and has been quietly trying to lure back foreign drillers. Fernando Llano AP
In this Feb. 19, 2015 photo, the sun sets behind an oil well in a field near El Tigre, a town within Venezuela's Hugo Chavez oil belt, formally known as the Orinoco Belt. President Nicolas Maduro, whose approval rating has plunged to around 25 percent, has no choice but to lean on state-fun oil company PDVSA to help Venezuela back on its feet and has been quietly trying to lure back foreign drillers. Fernando Llano AP

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