Army Sgt 1st Class Steve Rougeau, 52, of Orlando, heard about President Barack Obama's Nobel Peace Prize on the same day it was awarded and thought it was too soon in his tenure. "Someone else got gypped!” said Rougeau, a former corrections officer now doing duty with the Florida National Guard at the public affairs operation. It took days, and a visit from the foreign press, for some troops to learn about the prize at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Army Sgt 1st Class Steve Rougeau, 52, of Orlando, heard about President Barack Obama's Nobel Peace Prize on the same day it was awarded and thought it was too soon in his tenure. "Someone else got gypped!” said Rougeau, a former corrections officer now doing duty with the Florida National Guard at the public affairs operation. It took days, and a visit from the foreign press, for some troops to learn about the prize at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. MIAMI HERALD
Army Sgt 1st Class Steve Rougeau, 52, of Orlando, heard about President Barack Obama's Nobel Peace Prize on the same day it was awarded and thought it was too soon in his tenure. "Someone else got gypped!” said Rougeau, a former corrections officer now doing duty with the Florida National Guard at the public affairs operation. It took days, and a visit from the foreign press, for some troops to learn about the prize at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. MIAMI HERALD

So what do troops at Guantánamo think of commander's Nobel?

October 15, 2009 12:27 AM

UPDATED December 08, 2014 03:56 PM

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About Carol Rosenberg

Carol Rosenberg

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Carol Rosenberg reports on Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the place, policy, people, war court.