George "Smitty" Anderson receives pain-relieving Fentanyl patches on his back from his wife Pam inside their home in Augusta, Ga., on Aug. 22, 2015. He died at 62 on Nov. 5, 2015. Anderson worked at Savannah River Site for 17 years and said he developed multiple myeloma cancer from exposure while working at the plant. "From my knees up it hurts," he said. "It's affected every part of my life and my family's life." By August of this year, Smitty had lost a lot of weight, due in part to a blood clot and multiple surgeries on his left leg.
George "Smitty" Anderson receives pain-relieving Fentanyl patches on his back from his wife Pam inside their home in Augusta, Ga., on Aug. 22, 2015. He died at 62 on Nov. 5, 2015. Anderson worked at Savannah River Site for 17 years and said he developed multiple myeloma cancer from exposure while working at the plant. "From my knees up it hurts," he said. "It's affected every part of my life and my family's life." By August of this year, Smitty had lost a lot of weight, due in part to a blood clot and multiple surgeries on his left leg. Gerry Melendez McClatchy/The State
George "Smitty" Anderson receives pain-relieving Fentanyl patches on his back from his wife Pam inside their home in Augusta, Ga., on Aug. 22, 2015. He died at 62 on Nov. 5, 2015. Anderson worked at Savannah River Site for 17 years and said he developed multiple myeloma cancer from exposure while working at the plant. "From my knees up it hurts," he said. "It's affected every part of my life and my family's life." By August of this year, Smitty had lost a lot of weight, due in part to a blood clot and multiple surgeries on his left leg. Gerry Melendez McClatchy/The State

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