Clay Scott examines a wheat head from an irrigated wheat field near Ulysses, Kan., on June 9, 2015. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation wells are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled. And the energy costs of pumping have become higher than the cash rents Scott pays on the fields he leases. Scott says he knows there will come a day - sooner rather than later, if nothing is done - when irrigation is no longer viable in western Kansas.
Clay Scott examines a wheat head from an irrigated wheat field near Ulysses, Kan., on June 9, 2015. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation wells are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled. And the energy costs of pumping have become higher than the cash rents Scott pays on the fields he leases. Scott says he knows there will come a day - sooner rather than later, if nothing is done - when irrigation is no longer viable in western Kansas. Travis Heying The Wichita Eagle
Clay Scott examines a wheat head from an irrigated wheat field near Ulysses, Kan., on June 9, 2015. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation wells are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled. And the energy costs of pumping have become higher than the cash rents Scott pays on the fields he leases. Scott says he knows there will come a day - sooner rather than later, if nothing is done - when irrigation is no longer viable in western Kansas. Travis Heying The Wichita Eagle

The Great Plains’ invisible water crisis

July 24, 2015 12:42 PM