A study published in the journal Chronobiology International found that night owls — or people inclined to stay up late — have a 10 percent higher risk of an early death, as well as a heightened chance of getting diabetes, neurological disorders and respiratory disorders, when compared to morning people.
A study published in the journal Chronobiology International found that night owls — or people inclined to stay up late — have a 10 percent higher risk of an early death, as well as a heightened chance of getting diabetes, neurological disorders and respiratory disorders, when compared to morning people. Andrés Nieto Porras Creative Commons
A study published in the journal Chronobiology International found that night owls — or people inclined to stay up late — have a 10 percent higher risk of an early death, as well as a heightened chance of getting diabetes, neurological disorders and respiratory disorders, when compared to morning people. Andrés Nieto Porras Creative Commons

Are you a night owl? The answer determines your risk of an early death, study finds

April 12, 2018 11:05 AM