FILE- In this Sept. 26, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump appear on a monitor during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Opposition research is a typically inside-the-Beltway term that has burst onto the public stage with the disclosure that President Donald Trump's eldest son was receptive to an offer from a "Russian government attorney" for dirt on Clinton during the 2016 presidential campaign.
FILE- In this Sept. 26, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump appear on a monitor during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Opposition research is a typically inside-the-Beltway term that has burst onto the public stage with the disclosure that President Donald Trump's eldest son was receptive to an offer from a "Russian government attorney" for dirt on Clinton during the 2016 presidential campaign. Mary Altaffer, File AP Photo
FILE- In this Sept. 26, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump appear on a monitor during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Opposition research is a typically inside-the-Beltway term that has burst onto the public stage with the disclosure that President Donald Trump's eldest son was receptive to an offer from a "Russian government attorney" for dirt on Clinton during the 2016 presidential campaign. Mary Altaffer, File AP Photo

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AP Explains: How do politicians collect opposition research?

July 13, 2017 7:43 AM

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