The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board found this week that nuclear regulators failed to consider a growing saltwater plume when they allowed Florida Power & Light to raise operating temperatures in Turkey Point cooling canals to the hottest in the nation. Despite the finding, the board said local measures will likely address problems so no further environmental studies are needed.
The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board found this week that nuclear regulators failed to consider a growing saltwater plume when they allowed Florida Power & Light to raise operating temperatures in Turkey Point cooling canals to the hottest in the nation. Despite the finding, the board said local measures will likely address problems so no further environmental studies are needed. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board found this week that nuclear regulators failed to consider a growing saltwater plume when they allowed Florida Power & Light to raise operating temperatures in Turkey Point cooling canals to the hottest in the nation. Despite the finding, the board said local measures will likely address problems so no further environmental studies are needed. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Environment

Regulators ignored salt threat in approving higher canal temperatures at Turkey Point, safety board finds

June 01, 2016 6:11 PM

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